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Hospitality: A Relationship of Giving and Receiving

Just what is hospitality?

When we think about hospitality and the bible, we generally think about Martha and Mary hosting Jesus. And, we generally believe that Mary got it right. The truth is, neither one of them got it quite right! Why you might ask?

It is helpful to remember the origin and definition of biblical hospitality. In ancient Near East times, nomads practiced hospitality in the desert. A stranger would arrive at their camp, and it was common practice… even expected… that they would take in this stranger overnight, feed them, give them a place to sleep and care for them. In exchange, the stranger would share news with them… things that were going on in the world around them. Both contributions in the relationship were of equal value. The host depended on the stranger to stay informed and up to date on the news. Remember, no cell phones, no internet, no snail mail. This was it. It was a relationship of mutual trust and respect.

So hospitality is both giving and receiving…

There is a reaching out through simple acts of service, but also a drawing in of mutual gifts and surprises.  Neither Mary nor Martha got it quite right, but Mary, according to Jesus chose the best part of hospitality.

Martha welcomed Jesus into her home by cooking and cleaning and sheltering Jesus and the others… but Mary, took time to engage and receive the news they had to share. Together, Mary and Martha would have been exemplary hosts to Jesus… but Martha mistakenly thought that it was only about giving and doing rather than receiving. She missed the gift of the stranger… the news Jesus came to share.

In a time where churches everywhere need to grow, the practice of hospitality has never been more important. And we Americans are not so great at it. We tend to be Marthas… doing and giving… but not really good at receiving the gifts or news that the stranger brings.

We can practice hospitality both individually as well as corporately.

In both cases, there is always a mutual exchange. The trouble is, most churches are not ready for a mutual exchange. And yet, the love of God is generative… it changes things… and as we open our church to the stranger bearing new gifts and new expressions of love and worship, we need to ask ourselves if we are ready for whatever shape that may take.  There could be potential of deep hurt and injustice if we resist.

“(Hospitality) is a choice. We choose to reject suspicion as the first reaction to a stranger. We choose to minister along side of others rather than to them. We choose to let go of some of our own control when we meet strangers and when we interact with those we’ve known for years. We choose to expect surprises from strangers – good surprises that come from God.”– Michele Hershberger, A Christian View of Hospitality: Expecting Surprises

“Airbnb has proven that hospitality, generosity, and the simple act of trust between strangers can go a long way.”   – Joe Gebbia, CEO Airbnb

I believe that churches can and will grow as we practice this kind of hospitality. But, we need to be ready when God brings new people through our doors to receive the gifts they bring. We need to let go of our fears, our suspicions and our need to control and open our hearts to the wonderful surprises that they bring. So how do we work at this? How do we flex our spiritual muscles when it comes to hospitality?

Here are a few things we can try:

As a family:

Invite someone to your home for a simple meal. Try preparing as much as you can ahead of time so that you can spend most of your time listening to their stories and getting to know them better. After they leave, take time as a family to name what you appreciated most about your guest. Do you think that you were enriched some how ? Did you grow in anyway? Did you learn something new?

As an individual:

Make a special effort to welcome a new neighbor or a new colleague at work. Try taking them out for coffee or simply drop off a housewarming gift. Go with the idea of getting to know them and finding something you can appreciate about them. After your time together, offer a simple prayer to God thanking God for the gift in that person.

Just Remember:

Jesus once told a tale of sheep and goats. One group was successful in following Jesus the other group, well… it wasn’t. According to Jesus, the only difference between the two groups is what they did and didn’t do. One group was able to practice hospitality and one wasn’t… and that was important. Because Jesus told them, “Whenever you did it (Hospitality) for any of my people, no matter how unimportant they seemed, you did it for me.” – Matthew 25:40

 

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The Community Garden Project During Weekend of Service

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L to R: Sharon Helbert, Beth Burtner, George Toscano, and Julie Foster

There were six of us folks who participated in the Community Garden Service Project on our church grounds—Julie Foster, Beth Burtner, Brenda Fox, Sharon Helbert, Tish Moore, and George Toscano. We spent the first part of the morning on Saturday, August 13, 2016, putting a 3-foot wide border of cardboard layered with mulch around the garden, giving the garden and the plants a protective barrier. We only got 2/3rds of the way around the garden, but we were proud to get this much accomplished given the heat and humidity that day. The church’s garden group hopes to finish the project in the near future when the summer heat isn’t such a factor.

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Sharon Helbert selecting cardboard to place around the border of the garden.

 

 

 

 

 

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View of First Church’s community garden.

Our garden is a cooperative effort with the New Community Project (NCP). Currently, we have corn growing. The garden is not meant to be a typical garden laid out in neat rows and weed free. Rather it was created in a U-shape which allows it to take advantage of natural drainage. It also is not meant to be plowed but consist of a series of mounds.

Our community garden is a work in progress. So far we have only grown drought resistant plants. Things we still need to do are to get a water source hooked up, and to educate ourselves in order to implement NCP’s garden philosophy and methods. Additionally, we need individuals who can commit their personal time and some financial resources to expanding and maintaining our garden.

We followed up our work in the garden with a tour of the Vine & Fig, which is the community established by NCP along North Main Street in Harrisonburg. You have probably passed by their “White House” with the painted columns on the left side of the street just Washington Street.

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L to R: Julie Foster, Tish Moore, Tom Benevento (our tour guide at NCP), and a pastor from a Pennsylvania COB.

The goals of NCP are to practice peace, justice, and ecology. They transformed a neglected part of the city where there had been two crack houses and instead created living spaces for homeless individuals, individuals who have been in recovery for at least 6 months, immigrant families, and interns. In between the dwellings are gardens and energy conservation experiments. Products from the NCP gardens at this location and in the surrounding area are used in local restaurants as well as to feed the NCP community. In sum, NCP exists so we can learn to live simply in order to protect the earth’s resources, help individuals who have been at the margins of society, and promote peace and justice.

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The greenhouse with a fish pond.

NCP seeks to maximize the output they get from their living spaces and gardens. For example, a greenhouse was dug and built several feet underground in order to take advantage of the earth’s heat. NCP uses the greenhouse to grow food in the winter. They also dug a pond in the greenhouse to use to grow tilapia fish. The pond is under the planting slats, and water from the pond containing rich nutrients from fish excrement is used to fertilize the plants. The plastic covering the greenhouse reflects heat which warms the fig trees grown alongside it that need a warmer temperature. The fig trees, in turn, shade the greenhouse.

NCP works with outside individuals interested in preserving our environment and food resources, and has cooperative arrangements with a number of colleges such as Juniata College and Laverne College. On the day of our tour, a Laverne college intern was spending his last day at NCP and a group from a Brethren church in Pennsylvania was working in the gardens. We also observed a moment of silence when a bell tolled calling us to pause to slow down, enter a time of quiet, and enjoy the natural world around us.

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L to R: Julie Foster and Tish Moore checking WoS Facebook posts while at The Little Grill.

At the end of our Community Garden Service Project, we enjoyed a delicious lunch at the Little Grill, a worker owned coop and café. The Little Grill supports farm to table practices and uses local ingredients as much as possible.

A big thank you from the garden group to Julie Foster who planned a very enjoyable day for us!IMG_20160813_115747152_HDR

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Weekend of Services Signups Start July 24!

Sign Me Up!

Sign Me Up!

Weekend of Service Signups begin Sunday, July 24 for projects that will be held on Saturday, August 13. Signup sheets are located in the narthex along with donation boxes to provide the teams with the supplies they will need, if any.

Weekend of Service Projects

(1) School Kits – 8/13 – 9:00 am till done – Ruth & Auburn Boyers Assemble 100 school kits in church Fellowship Hall for delivery to the Shenandoah District Office School Kits

1 pair rounded tip blunt metal scissors

3 70-count spiral notebooks or notebooks totaling 200-210 pages

1 30-centimeter ruler (12 ʺ)

1 hand-held pencil sharpener

1 box 24 (only) crayons

1 large eraser

6 new pencils with erasers

1 12ʺ x14ʺ to 14ʺ x17ʺ cotton or lightweight canvas bag with cloth handles

NO LOOSE-LEAF OR FILLER PAPER

(2) New Community Project (NCP) Garden on Church Grounds – 8/13 – 9:00 am through lunch – Julie Foster and NCP Representative The group will be working to create a weed-free barrier or edge approximately 3-feet wide around the entire garden with wood chips. If the group completes the barrier, they will put in fall flowers on the edge facing the road. The group will work until10:45 am. Then, the group will go to Vine and Fig to get a tour and informational session regarding projects located at the NCP white house on North Main/Liberty Street. After that, the group will go to The Little Grill Co-op for lunch. Individuals will then have the opportunity to join other Weekend of Service projects after lunch. Flat cardboard – large pieces (broken down boxes, etc.)
(3) Grocery Bag Distribution & Collection for Blue Ridge Area Food Bank – 8/13 – All day – Derek Young & Micah Morris Youth and advisors, and interested adults, will distribute bags in the community on both 8/3 and 8/10. They will collect the bags and deliver the food to the Blue Ridge Area Food Bank on 8/13. Cereal

Peanut or Almond Butter

Canned Tuna and Chicken

Canned Soups, Stews and Chili

Canned Fruit

Canned Veggies

Beans, Canned or Dried

Boxed Mac & Cheese

Pasta and Rice

Spaghetti Sauce

Paper Products

Baby Food, Formula, and Diapers

Soap, Toothbrushes, and Feminine Products

(4a) Park Trash Pick-up and Bottled Water Distribution – 8/13 – All Day – Heather Smith & Sandy Kinsey

(4b) 2:00 p.m. – Bingo with Bridgewater Assisted Living Residents (2nd Floor Activities Room)

Children and interested adults will clean up Westover Park behind the church. Afterwards they will distribute bottled water to individuals in this and possibly another park. They will conclude the day with a visit to Bridgewater Retirement Community to play a game of Bingo with the residents. Bring a hat & wear sunscreen Large Trash Bags

Small Surgical Type Plastic Gloves

Bottled Water

(5) Hospital & Firehouse Visits – 8/13 – All Day – Carol Stickley & Cathy Grogg Visit the local hospital, fire stations, and emergency squads, and distribute candy with notes attached thanking the staff for their service to the community Lollipops

Ribbon

(6) Camp Brethren Woods – 8/13 – All Day – Camp Representative Work at Camp Brethren Woods staining wood railings and decks if time permits. The camp was so happy with the work that we did to last year that they would like us to help them again with staining Supplies to be provided by the Camp
(7) Salvation Army – 8/13 – All Day – Emily Morris Dust and steam clean/ vacuum the men’s area of the Shelter. Also clean windows. The Shelter provides cleaning supplies, but appreciates donations. Items that you might want to bring are cleaning supplies, plastic work gloves, and cleaning rags

We will use the same T-Shirts as last year. If you want to order one, there is a signup sheet for this as well. Payment for these is on a donations basis (write a check to the church with WoS T-Shirts in the memo line).

We are collecting Food for the Blue Ridge Area Food Bank, and New or Gently Used Paperbacks for the Middle River Regional Jail’s Library.

The Weekend will start off with entertainment on Friday evening (planning still in the works). There will be a simple breakfast available on Saturday morning (bagels and coffee) prior to our prayer/commissioning service which will begin at 8:30 a.m. Then we will break into teams and head out at for the service projects. Upon returning to the church, a cook-out will be served followed by free swimming from 7:00-8:00 p.m. at the Cecil F. Gilkerson Community Center pool just behind the church.

Camping. Interested individuals and families can pitch their tents or bring their campers and park them on church grounds both Friday and Saturday nights. All are welcome to the camp fires and S’mores where sharing of the days’ events and fellowship will be enjoyed. Please just indicate on the project signup sheets whether you plan to camp either or both nights.

On Sunday, August 14 during the church service, the project teams will share their experiences and reflections on our 2016 Weekend of Service. So come to our Weekend with your smart phones, cameras, enthusiasm, families and friends. And follow us at #loveserverepeat, Harrisonburgfirstcob.org, and https://www.facebook.com/fcobharrisonburg/.

Follow us!

Follow us!

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Weekend of Service – August 12-14, 2016

Kids Group 2

Our Weekend of Service (WoS) is about a month away and will take place August 12-14, 2016. The Weekend will kick-off on Friday evening and will be followed by half or full-day service projects on Saturday, ending with a cookout and swim time at the community center behind First Church. During Sunday’s service we will hear reports from the different project teams.

During our contacts with different agencies, Middle River Regional Jail indicated that they would like to receive either new or used (in good condition) paperbacks for their library. They are interested in a wide range of reading materials – fiction and non-fiction, auto and biographical, history, and westerns (a particular favorite). If you have books that you would like to donate, please place them in the appropriate box in the narthex.

Meanwhile the Harrisonburg City Jail said that they would like copies of paperback bibles. If you would like to donate toward the purchase of bibles, please write a check to the church and in the memo line indicate “City Jail Bibles”.

In the next few weeks be looking for project descriptions and sign-up sheets, donation boxes in the narthex for needed supplies, and further details in upcoming bulletins, on this webpage and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/fcobharrisonburg/.

Hospital Visitation Group 3

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For such a time as this…

Over the next five weeks, we will take a look at the book of Esther.  If you haven’t read Esther, I’d encourage you to read it! It reads like a thriller or even a romance novel. And yet, we can learn much about what it means to live a life committed to God and to one another as the body of Christ during difficult times. Do you ever feel like your swimming upstream? That the choices you make and your commitment to faith seems so foreign to others that you find it difficult to stay the course? Perhaps you feel discouraged and insignificant or unable to change things anyway? These are some of the very things that we read about in the book of Esther.

As part of our study, we will look at the different characters in the story and the choices that each of them make in their own times; some in faithfulness to God and some quite faithless at all. we’ll be challenged to reevaluate our own choices. We will be reminded that each of us have been given gifts and passions for God to use to effect change and bring about justice in our own communities. Together, we’ll ask ourselves the famous question Mordecai asked Esther:”Who knows if you have not become royal for such a time as this?”

Join us for worship Sundays at 10:30!

Pastor Beth

the empty chair

It’s. All. About. Love.

Who doesn’t love to hear the parable of the prodigal son? Or the parable of the lost sheep and the lost coin? We love hearing these stories about God’s immense love for us and being reminded of our value as children of God. But there’s the rub. These stories are not necessarily about us. They are about the other. We have all grown up loving these wonderful stories about God’s love but we rarely take into account the context of these three wonderful parables:

“Now the tax collectors and sinners were all gathering around to hear Jesus. But the Pharisees and the teachers of the law muttered, “This man welcomes sinners and eats with them.” – Luke 15:1-2.

During the time of Jesus, there was a vibrant renewal movement going on among the Pharisees, Sadducees and Teachers of the Law. It involved a rigorous keeping of “every jot and tittle” of the law. They were especially focused on the rituals of table fellowship following strict dietary codes, ritual cleansing and purity laws as well as eating with only those who were “pure” like them. It is important for us to remember the play of words for Luke in this context. “Pharisees and teachers of the law” were a part of this Torah and Table renewal. “Tax collectors and sinners” refers to all who were not rigorously observing these table rituals, Jews included. So you can imagine just how unnerving it was for this influential teacher of the law, son of God, Jesus to eat and drink with sinners.

Marcus Borg in his book, Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time writes,

“The open table fellowship of Jesus was thus perceived to be a challenge to the purity system. And it was: the meals of Jesus embodied his alternative vision of an inclusive community. The ethos of compassion led to an inclusive table fellowship, just as the ethos of purity led to a closed fellowship.”

So imagine with me for a moment this earthy, radical, young and influential Jewish rabbi Jesus sitting around a table with those people… you know those people who aren’t keeping the law, people who made you unclean. You know, those people who make us feel uncomfortable,who aren’t like us. Right? Anyway they are laughing and eating and drinking at the same table as Jesus. They are rubbing shoulders with him! Jesus is teaching them, loving them, affirming them but most of all he is including them in this new kingdom of God.

Now imagine with me, a group of people in the background, they are whispering in hushed voices about the company that Jesus is keeping. How could this prophet keep company with the likes of these people? Doesn’t he know that they don’t obey the law of the scriptures? Doesn’t he know that they are making him unclean and not fit to worship or teach in the temple? What will other churches think if he keeps letting people like that come to Bible studies?

Unfortunately, this is a very common occurrence in our Christian communities.

Churches spend more energy in dark corners worrying about who’s in and who’s out, arguing about the rules and those people, rather than focusing their energy and resources on actually loving people.

Richard Rohr recently wrote in his recent blog entry, “learning to love”,

“Jesus became someone to actually imitate and not just to collectively worship. Believe it or not, this has hardly ever been the norm or practice of most Christians. We preferred Sunday morning worship services and arguing about how to conduct them or prohibiting each other from attending “heretical” church services. God must just cry.”  – Richard Rohr

So overhearing their murmuring, Jesus responds to these Pharisees and naysayers with three parables. Each parable tells us something of Jesus and his love for the other… those people.

In the parable of the lost sheep, Jesus wants us to remember that the one sheep that wondered away from the flock because he couldn’t hear or chose to ignore the shepherd’s voice is as important to the good shepherd as the other 99 sheep who were faithfully following their masters voice and commands.

Now to tease this out you have to remember the audience. The 99 sheep who were keeping the commandments were of course, the Pharisees. Their life was committed to keeping all of the commandments, observing all of the purity rituals, making all of the appropriate sacrifices… and because of that, they felt protected. They were in the flock. They were secure.

But the good shepherd does something just crazy! He leaves all of those obedient ones and runs after the one sheep who, for whatever the reason, is not obeying the shepherds voice. And when he finds the sheep he beats him and punishes him and gives him what he deserves! Good on him.

No, he puts the sheep on his shoulders and carries him home. He calls his friends together and says rejoice with me!

Similarly, in the second parable, the widow loses a precious coin. She looks all over the house trying to find it. Who among us hasn’t lost something precious to us only to desperately try to find it? We put microchips in our pets, find our phone apps so we can locate our cell phones when they’re missing. When we recover those precious things there is genuine joy, relief and celebration. How much more rejoicing in heaven will there be over one lost soul that finds its way back into the loving arms of Jesus?

You see, Jesus is saying two things here:

  1. All of humanity belongs to God. We are all created by God. We are all loved. We are all valuable to God… so valuable that God will go to all extremes to recover what belongs to him.
  2. People are more important than rules.

Have you ever wondered why we get so hung up on the rules and place such importance on them? They give us a false sense of safety. If we are following all the rules well then, we’re good when it comes to God and well, he must really love us! Subsequently, all of those others who are not keeping God’s commands, well they are wrong. They are out. God doesn’t love them as much as he loves us.

This is the rub for the Pharisees in Luke chapter 15. Jesus sums it all up for them at the end of the prodigal son story… you may remember the son goes out and squanders all of the inheritance while the older brother remains at home… working hard…. Keeping all of the rules. When the younger son finally returns home the father throws a huge feast, killing the fatted calf reserved for the most extravagant occasions. The older son is nowhere to be found. The father goes out to find the older son… you know… the Pharisee… sulking because it isn’t fair. The father should love him more for being obedient. Its just human nature.

But notice what Father says in the parable:

“‘My son,’ the father said, ‘you are always with me, and everything I have is yours. But we had to celebrate and be glad, because this brother of yours was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found.’”

Jesus tells this parable so that they can understand. The inclusion of others doesn’t exclude them! It brings the kingdom of God a little closer. Luke retells this story to remind the church to rejoice over the recovery of life and the inclusion of the other. We are to make room at the table!

Jesus told his disciples in John 13:

 “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” – John 13:34-35

 You see my friends, it’s all about love. It’s the one thing that we need to get right as the church. It’s the power of God’s love that wins, that melts the hardest heart, that consoles the loneliest heart, that restores the heart that is broken.

 

 

Practicing the Sabbath... yielding for God's provision

A Quest for Jesus – Journeying toward a deeper relationship with Jesus

Practicing the Sabbath... yielding for God's provisionDear Friends,

Over the past year, I have found myself wondering about our country’s current expression of Christianity. I have often felt overwhelmed with Christian mud slinging in the name of Jesus, words of judgment and hate paraded across the Internet, and sometimes-downright heresy. I confess that at times I found myself feeling ashamed to call myself Christian.  How could there be such vast differences between the Jesus I have come to know and love through scripture and the political, pop culture Jesus that seems to dominate social media? It grieves me. It concerns me. It humbles me.

As I began to pray about our Church’s Lenten Season, I sensed an invitation to journey more deeply toward Jesus. I began to share my thoughts and feelings with some of my colleagues and they recommended several books. So, I picked four books and invited several persons in the congregation to prayerfully read them with me. As a pastor, this was more than a personal journey; it was a subject of prayer and searching on behalf of our congregation. The books we read together are: Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time: the Historical Jesus and Contemporary Faith – Marcus Borg, Myth of a Christian Nation: How the Quest for political Power Is Ruining the Church – Greg Boyd, The Jesus I Never Knew – Phillip Yancey, A Farewell to Mars: An Evangelical Pastor’s Journey Toward the Gospel of Peace – Brian Zahnd

The brothers and sisters that I asked graciously agreed to read with me and ponder following questions: What is the most important thing you learned about Jesus and the Church from your book? How has that impacted you? If you could share one thing you have learned with the congregation, what would it be? What passage of scripture best demonstrates this new understanding?

After reading the books, we met together and discussed what we had learned. We shared new and fresh perspectives that we had gained about Jesus and Scripture. After a rich conversation, we identified the following topics that we will cover each Sunday in Lent. These are the things that the Holy Spirit seemed to highlight for us.

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Lent 1 – Sunday February 14th

“It’s. All. About. Love.”

Luke 15:1-32

Children’s thought: Did you get a Valentine for Valentine’s Day? Did you know that God sent you one too? God sent us Jesus to show us how much he loves us! No matter what we look like, or what we have done, or what kind of grades we make, God is in love with us! He thinks we are great! God wants us to share that valentine with others.

 

Lent 2 – Sunday February 21st

“The slow way: modeling power under as opposed to power over.”

Scripture: Luke 4:1-13

Children’s thought – Jesus was a servant. He served others instead of serving himself even when he didn’t have to.

 

Lent 3 – Sunday February 28th

“Live Christ-like now.”

Luke 6:1-32

Children’s thought – Has anyone ever done something nice for you that made you feel really good? How about when you didn’t deserve it, has that ever happened to you? It’s a really special thing when we think we are going to get in trouble for something we did but instead someone reminds us of how much they love us and does something kind for us! That’s how Jesus is! Jesus wants us to live that way too.

 

Lent 4 – Sunday March 6th

“It’s not about what we shouldn’t do… it’s about what we should do.”

Luke 10:25-37

Children’s thought – We hear a lot of “should not’s” in life don’t we? But Jesus spent a lot of time teaching us about “should’s”. He wanted us to know how important it is to love people. We should love. We should be kind. We should help people when they need it.

 

Lent 5 – Sunday March 13th

“The kingdom of God is happening right now, here, today.”

Luke 7:18-35

Children’s thought – Have you ever wondered what heaven is like? I know we all do! Jesus wants us to live today as happy as we would be when we are in heaven. In fact, he wants people to see what his kingdom is like on earth right now! Do you know how that’s supposed to happen? You and I are to help people see heaven by loving one another, helping one another and caring about one another.

 

Lent 6 – Sunday March 20th (Palm Sunday)

“It’s easy to fall into group thinking – take time to discern kingdom living.”

Luke 19:28-38

Children’s thought – We hear a lot these days about the presidential election don’t we? Did you know that when Jesus rode into town on the donkey that people were waving their palms because they thought he was going to be the president… or the King? Everyone was convinced! The whole group thought that Jesus was going to set the world strait by making Israel a powerful nation. What would you do if you were going to be president? Jesus did something completely unexpected. He decided he would be a servant instead. Can you imagine that? He washed people’s feet! He served them dinner… and he even went to jail and was punished in the place of other criminals. That’s a very different kind of kingdom isn’t it?

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As we begin this season of Lent, I invite you to consider what Jesus said in John 14:6, “I am the way, the truth and the light.” Jesus is the way. Jesus is the Truth. Jesus is the light that illumines our perplexing times. How much do we actually know and understand about His way? How much time do we spend reading His story in the Bible under the tutelage of the Holy Spirit? I want to encourage you to make a journey toward Jesus this Lenten Season. What can you strip away in your own life that will free you to relate to Jesus more deeply?

Journeying with you in Christ,

Pastor Beth

12 Baskets and a Goat Image

12 Baskets and a Goat

12 Baskets and a Goat ImageOn November 14, 2015, the old Sale Barn on Sunny Slope Farm was the site of the first pilot show of 12 Baskets and a Goal, a project of Ted & Co, Heifer International, and the Church of the Brethren in support of Heifer’s work around the world. The event featured the play, The Jesus Stories: Faith, Forks, and Fettuccine, written and performed by Ted Swartz and Jeff Raught, interrupted at two intervals to auction off home-made breads and cakes. It was an evening filled with humor, laughter, and generous support of Heifer International. Over $5,000 was raised during the evening with all proceeds going to Heifer International.

The 12 Baskets and a Goal project (http://www.tedandcompany.com/shows/12-baskets-and-a-goat/) “seeks to raise awareness of poverty and empower communities to restore dignity to those in need.The Jesus Stories “asks two questions….what are we having to eat and who are we eating it with? It’s a play about Jesus and food; about what we need every day to sustain us, nourish us, and connect us with God and with others.” The play, which features original songs and music by Jeff, blends humor and theological reflection. Over the next three years, Ted and Co hope to perform their play and auctions all over the country for the benefit of Heifer International.

Ted Swartz and Jeff Raught performing The Jesus Stories

Ted Swartz and Jeff Raught performing The Jesus Stories

First Church of the Brethren’s Friendship Class gave money to help cover startup costs for the event at Sunny Slope Farm. Members of the class also donated $1,000 in support of Heifer International. The youth donated jars of their recently made apple butter. Other members of the church donated cakes and breads. Many of the breads were auctioned off in baskets donated by Cathy Cupp, Linda Logan’s sister.

Beth and Harry Jarrett’s farm, Sunny Slope Farm, is a certified Virginia Century Farm, owned and operated by the family for 186 years.

Pastor Beth among the gathering crowd

Pastor Beth among the gathering crowd

No Tricks Just Treats

“No Tricks – Just Treats!”

No Tricks Just TreatsReal Wedding On Sunny Slope Farm

On Saturday October 31st, 2015 – Halloween Evening – from 5:00 pm to 10:00 pm, Sunny Slope Farm is having an event – “No Tricks – Just Treats” for folks of all ages! Scrumptious food, great music, and thrilling games for all will be featured. Tickets are available online at a cost of $5.00/person. Tickets will not be for sale at the event and only advance sale ticket purchasers may enter.

Food vendors include a hearty meal from Mamma’s Caboose and tantalizing deserts from Smiley’s Ice Cream food truck. Vendors such as Dove Chocolate will also be available. Additional food trucks maybe added based on tickets sales.

The evening entertainment will be provided by three of JMU’s stellar A Capella groups Madison Project, Into Hymn, and Rescored – something you won’t want to miss!

Painting pumpkins, sack races, corn hole, face painting, and other lawn games will be available.

First Church of the Brethren is one of only two area youth programs that will benefit from proceeds of not only the ticket sales, but also a percentage of the food sales too! We want to encourage all our families to support this event by purchasing tickets to attend, and also by letting other folks know about the event! Our youth program plans to use funds from the event to increase the number of times per year that they serve the Salvation Army Shelter Meal.

So grab your friends, a warm blanket to cozy up in, and enjoy a memorable evening of laughter and harvest cheer!

This is a non-alcohol family friendly event. Sunny Slope Farm is Pastor Beth’s husband – Harry’s Event Venue. For directions, go to http://onsunnyslopefarm.com/.

Sunny Slope Farm Sign

 

small group 3

Multiply Groups Underway

small group 3

The Multiply Small Groups are underway! If you are interested in checking out a group or the series of studies, you can still do so. Multiply was the brain child of Frances Chan and David Platt, authors of the book Multiply. The goals of the Multiply material, which are simple, practical, and Biblical, are to help individuals understand Scripture and to give them the tools to disciple others. The book and related materials are available free of charge online at https://multiplymovement.com/; however, the Multiply materials have been adapted for an intergenerational audience and specific age groups at First Church by members of our Discipleship Coordinating Committee: Linda Logan, Emily Morris, Casey Morris, Pastor Beth, and Derek Young. The Multiply Small Groups are the following:

Small Group Meeting Time Meeting Location Facilitator(s)
Elective Sunday School Class 9:30-10:15 a.m. Sunday 2nd Floor Front Classroom (above Narthex)* John Mark Logan & Daphyne Thomas
Covenant Sunday School Class 9:30-10:15 a.m. Sunday Conference Room* Libby Smith & Roy McCutcheon
Friendship Sunday School Class 9:30-10:15 a.m. Sunday Friendship Classroom* Auburn Boyers & Linda Logan
College/Career Group (post high school to 25 yrs of age)

 

4:30-6:00 p.m. Sunday Conference Room* Derek Young
Multiply Small Group 6:30 p.m. Monday Home of Emily & Henry Morris (child care available) Micah Morris
Multiply Small Group Tuesday Home of Emily & Henry Morris Members alternate as facilitators
Bridgewater Home Group 1:30-3:00 p.m. Wednesday Community Room

Assisted Living 3rd Floor

Bridgewater Retirement Home

Jo Ann Soucek & Brenda Fox
Praize Kidz Bible Study 6:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesday Children’s Music Room in Basement* Sharon Helbert
Multiply Small Group 6:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesday Conference Room* John Staubus
Stickley/Young Small Group 7:30-9:00 p.m. Thursday Youth Room off Gym* Carol & Chris Stickley & Derek Young
Downtown Dinner Group 8:00 p.m. Thursday Various restaurants Abe Shearer

*These locations are in First Church of the Brethren, 315 S. Dogwood Dr., Harrisonburg, VA

If you need additional information or have questions, please call the church office at 540-434-8288.