When the going gets tough

I think that we as Christians skip over the immense pain and suffering that Jesus experienced the week leading up to his death. Though there are many stories in between, we tend to move from the shouting Hosannas in church on Palm Sunday to the Hallelujahs of his resurrection on Easter Sunday. Yes, many of us do have a Maundy Thursday meal and even a Good Friday service… but we rarely live with the Gethsemane experience for any length of time.

Immediately following his triumphant entry into Jerusalem, with the crowds cheering and blessing him, Jesus enters into a very dark week. He goes into the temple only to be heart broken and angered by the disrespect and corruption of his father’s house… it should be a place of prayer but instead, it had become a place of deceit, bribery and corruption. Humanity truly needed a savior and he was fully aware of what the price would be.

The following day he was harassed by the chief priests and teachers of the law. They questioned his motives behind his actions. They wondered who gave Jesus the authority to behave the way he did. They threatened him and ridiculed him with poignant hatred, “Who do you think you are?”

The next day, one of his closest friends agreed to betray him and hand him over to the authorities for 30 pieces of silver… the common price of a slave. Perhaps Jesus could have anticipated this from someone else, but one of his own?

The heaviness of what was to come must have been heavy on his heart as he celebrated his last passover meal with the persons he had lived with, taught and loved intensely for the past several years, his disciples.

It was in this immense, dark place that Jesus found himself struggling to pursue God in the garden.

We may never have a week like that of Jesus, but many of us do enter into dark and difficult times. We all experience deep disappointment, despair, loneliness, dread, heart brokenness, depression, anxiety… you can fill in the blanks. The question is, what will we do in that dark place?

Jesus pursues God even when he doesn’t want to do what is being asked of him. He surrounds himself with persons who will help him, he prays and waits for God’s assistance, and he relinquishes his desire and control over the situation.

When we find ourselves in difficult times or in a dark night experience we can learn from our Savior who has walked through the darkest of nights. We can share our struggle with one or two close friends, we can sit and pray our laments honestly in God’s presence, and we can relinquish our brokenness and darkness before God knowing that only God can deliver us.

It is comforting to know from the Gospel of Luke that angels of light came to Jesus’ after he prayed. God didn’t take the cup away from Jesus. He would still drink from the cup of death and suffering, but God did come to his aid in the dark night.

What then are we to do? Try to muster up enough strength to take a few baby steps toward others and God and then wait for him to find us.

0 replies
  1. Robert Martin
    Robert Martin says:

    Oh, how true this is, that we experience dark times… I’m in one now… but funny thing, for whatever reason, except for the initial reaction, it hasn’t felt that dark. It’s scary, uncertain… but not dark. There’s a light in my life that goes beyond what this world throws at me.

    Thanks for this reflection, Beth!

    Reply
    • Beth Jarrett
      Beth Jarrett says:

      Blessings as you find your way through this dark time, Robert. It sounds like you are aware of God’s presence with you. What spiritual practices do you find helpful when you find yourself in a Gethsemane type of place?

      Reply
      • Robert Martin
        Robert Martin says:

        For me, study of the Word and meditation. I’ve never been a good “prayer” per se… It’s more like “Hey, God… I’m struggling here…” and then a lot of just gentle pondering, trying to capture every thought and say, “What do you think, God?” and waiting in the silence… And sometimes silence is all I get but I know my God walks with me… Psalm 22, as depressing as it seems, holds a message of hope… That is what I cling to most… And then my theme verse is still Job 1:21.

        Reply

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